Davy Crockett’s Running Frontier

I like to Run Insanely Long & Crazy Distances                                                                                                             Pony Express Trail 100
                                                                                                                                                                            www.ponyexpress100.org

Browsing Posts published in September, 2010

The Bear 100 was the first 100-miler I attempted back in 2004.  It was a small event that year with 51 starters.  At mile 87 after 30 hours of running/hiking, I found myself in last place with very little energy left.  I asked my pacing friend to flag down an ATV or motorcycle to help get us to the finish.  At the finish line, I watched other runners finish their 100-miles.  I shook my head and told my family that this race was way over my abilities, that I could never finish it.  But in 2010, I was back again to challenge “The Bear” for the 7th time, seeking my 6th finish.

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The Wasatch Front 100 is the premier ultramarathon locally.  It is in its 31st year and is a labor of love for many of the founders of ultrarunning in Utah.  It is thrilling to just watch and observe their dedication and efforts to pull off an amazing event like this.  This was my 3rd year running Wasatch 100.  I don’t run it every year, some years I have run other races in its place.  But it is great to run on the trails with so many local runners and others from out of state who have flown in to experience the majestic Wasatch mountains.

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The Bear River – Smiths Fork Trail (#091) (Also sometimes referred to as the North Slope Trail) is a long-forgotten trail in the Uinta Mountains that crosses the North Slope from west to east.  This mostly forest trail connects seven river forks, and climbs up and over six major ridges.  It covers nearly 30 miles with climbs totaling more than 7,000 feet.  The altitude for the route is between 8,800 feet and 10,800 feet. 

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